About

After Vasari,

as in storied or mannered thereafter.

And After Vasari,

as in so many moons since.

.     .     .

Giorgio Vasari was a sixteenth-century Italian painter whose greatest legacy is The Lives of the Artists, a collection of writings about Renaissance artists, their styles, their lives and their works. He considered the High Renaissance to be “art’s rebirth” and a “state of perfection,”* and he channeled his enthusiasm for the period’s artists into his then somewhat groundbreaking and by now timeless tome.

With a similar spirit of inquiry, part of this blog is devoted to writings on individual artists, mostly in the form of studio visit write-ups or exhibition essays. Other parts of this blog feature art writings or reviews of a more general sort. Still other parts might feature just an artwork or two accompanied by a bit of text, such as a poem or a chunk of prose.

And that sums up what we’re about, more or less, and what you’ll find on this blog, more or less.

We hope you’ll find a thing or two you like.

.     .     .

Alice Lynn McMichael  is a PhD candidate in Byzantine art history. As such, she takes issue with Vasari’s comment that Byzantine art was “awkward” in style. She has a BFA in graphic design and worked as an art director in magazines before her transition into researching and writing about art. She is also an avid photographer and traveler, which means she relishes opportunities to apply those passions to travel writing as well.

Paul D’Agostino holds a PhD in Italian Literature and is an artist, writer, translator, curator, professor and whatever else. He writes in and translates among a number of languages, primarily Italian, German, French, Spanish, English and several others. He teaches at various institutions, and he holds or has held editorial posts at a number of publications. He is also Director of Centotto Gallery. More boring info about him is here.

Contact us at aftervasari@gmail.com.

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*Giorgio Vasari, The Lives of the Artists, trans. Julia Conaway Bondanella and Peter Bondanella, (New York: Oxford University Press, 1991).